Being Cabin Crew and a Health Care Worker during a Pandemic: Covid-19

“Never bend your head. Always hold it high. Look the world straight in the eye”

– Helen Keller

Well it’s been about 3 months since I last blogged as when the world stopped, my ability to be inspired did. One day though, I’d like my future grandchildren/great grandchildren to be able look back to see what I actually did during the Covid-19 Pandemic of 2020.

My last flight was to San Diego in March 2020, just as all the restrictions began to come into effect. After this I was then eventually Furloughed initially until the end of May which then changed to the end of June which meant no more flying for me for the foreseeable future. Although it was inevitable as I had seen the changes happening from the beginning of the year, when the virus did eventually hit the UK, it was apparent then how it was going to have an effect on my life now.

As I am a Health Care worker, I was straight back into my usual role but now called a ‘Key Worker’. I have never stopped working in Care even when I became Cabin Crew and work as bank staff anyway so I was a bit uncomfortable being called a ‘key worker’ at first. For me, i was just doing a job I’ve always loved, what I’m trained to do, just that now there was more of a risk to our vulnerable clients which meant to protect myself to the maximum meant I was protecting them in the community. I know some people did struggle with the enormity of the risk at the start which is totally understandable but for me, I literally had no fear of the virus. I had been following strict hygiene routines and government guidelines since January because as Crew, we could have been exposed to it before it even hit the UK so it wasn’t like a shock or something unexpected for me when it did reach here. It is the biggest health crisis we have ever known so it only felt right that I was back on solid ground to be able to do what I could.

I work in Complex Care so predominantly with people with Spinal Injury, some have tracheostomy, complex care needs etc so vital they are protected more than ever as the virus raged on. I was also ready to work at the Nightingale Hospital in Manchester which was one of the special makeshift NHS hospitals for when people who had been in ICU with COVID-19, were well enough to come out of ICU and recover in the Nightingale before they could go home. If I’d have gone to work in the Nightingale Hospital, I wouldn’t have been able to do my own care job as the risk would have been to great for the clients so I knew it was one or the other and as we were at the start of something that could have overwhelmed the NHS even more than it was, I wanted to offer my skills to just be able to take a bit of pressure off the amazing NHS staff.

However, as it turned out, the Nightingale Hospitals were not used like they were expected to be which was obviously a positive, meaning that although it has been absolutely tragic the loss of life we have seen around the world, it wasn’t the overwhelming surge in Covid patients requiring the Nightingales. Although they wasn’t used to the capacity they were made for, it was fantastic that we had them there and prepared.

I don’t know what the next few weeks will bring as the airline I work for, as it is reported and highly publicised daily, will be making 1000s of staff redundant. Things might change in the coming weeks and hopefully it will for the better.

So that is what this Trolley Dolley has been doing during the Covid-19 Pandemic of 2020 and hopefully whatever happens, I won’t be stopping travelling and exploring, it just might be a different way in the future.

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